Monday, July 6, 2009

Prize, steps and back porch

- The Old Governor's Mansion, Milledgeville, Georgia, circa 1839, home to Georgia's governors until the end of the Civil War. The pink stucco mansion is considered to be one of the finest examples of High Greek Revival architecture in the nation. Designed by architect Charles Clusky, an Irish immigrant, and built by Timothy Porter of Farmington, Connecticut, it was claimed as a "prize" in the "March to the Sea," when General William T. Sherman headquartered in the building on November 22, 1864. It even has a cameo part in E.L. Doctorow's novel, "The March" in which a character in the book can see the Union army inside the house from the windows of her home across the street. In 1973 the Mansion was designated a National Historic Landmark by the Trust for Historic Preservation.

- Spending the 4th of July in my home town and sitting on the post office steps at noon to call my sister in Florida. Suddenly the bells of Sacred Heart Catholic Church begin to play God Bless America and My Country 'Tis of Thee to an otherwise deserted downtown, making for appropriate patriotic background music.

- Being served up a sizzling steak cooked on the grill by my still recovering father. He got just the right amount of char on it. And it was nice sitting on the back porch with him to see him at his usual grillin' self.

10 comments:

Talon said...

Wow! Another gorgeous building! This columned style is what I always think of when I think of the south.

There was definite syncronicity at play while you were talking to your sister, Lynn!

I'm so glad your father is feeling well enough to serve up some barbeque.

Lynn said...

Talon -

It was an awfully pretty day on the 4th and not too hot. Yes - my sister knew exactly where I was when the bells started ringing. We both are back and forth a lot to run errands, etc. for our parents. I liked it that they wanted to make sure we had something special for dinner for the holiday - a sign that things are improving!

The interior of the mansion has been renovated recently - people are coming from all over the world to see it. My favorite part of the inside still after all these years (first viewed when on a middle school tour): The foyer leads to a central rotunda with a high domed skylight ceiling, and an octagonal room beyond. A circular balcony projects into the rotunda.

Mama Zen said...

That building is stunning.

Lynn said...

Mama Zen -

It is stunning. My mom and I went on a tour last year to see it again after the renovation and when we were viewing the outdoor kitchen area she glimpsed someone inside. But it turned out that no one was in there - so I think she saw a ghost! How cool is that? :)

Talon said...

Sounds sooo lovely, Lynn. I'm thinking the ghosts are pleased with the renovations, too!

Lynn said...

Talon -

That would be a great house to be a ghost in. :) There is also a pre-Civil war era cemetery down the street. Might have to do some photos there on another visit.

Jannie Funster said...

Oh, I would've totally cried during that church bell ringing. I'm such a sap. I don't mean out-and-out sobbing on someone's shoulder, but it would've for sure brough tears to my big blue eye.

Lynn said...

Jannie -

Yes indeed - a perfect moment. There is much I miss about small town living - such as that.

I'm a sap, too. Did you cry at the film Lance posted the other day? Loved it.

Jannie Funster said...

Yes on Lance's film! The "Stand by me one."

And have you seen this one? I'm sure you probably have.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WkBepgH00GM

Certainly brought me a tear or two, of joy of course.

Lynn said...

I'll look at it tonight. Thanks for sending!